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The Mid-Atlantic Equity Center Online Sessions

MAEC/WestEd Webinar: Strategies to Teach Academic Language

This session was originally held on September 29, 2016.

The interactive webinar on Helping English Learners Learn Academic Language was organized by the Mid-Atlantic Comprehensive Center (MACC@WestEd) and the Mid-Atlantic Equity Consortium.

 

Creating Effective Multi-tiered Systems of Support to Meet the Academic, Social-Emotional, & Behavioral Needs of Our Students

This session was originally held on March 24, 2016.

Presenters: 

tfaed adelefabrikant dc-155-x155Dr. Adele Fabrikant, Effective School Leadership Researcher & former Deputy Chief, Office of Youth Engagement, District of Columbia Public Schools

Ms. Kristina Kyles-Smith, Assistant State Superintendent, Division of Student, Family, and School Support, Maryland Statement Department of Education (MSDE)

 

 

Description: In order to meet the needs of every student, state departments of education and school districts must develop multi-tiered systems of support to meet students' academic, social-emotional, and behavioral needs. This webinar will explore effective best practices for statewide and district-wide systems of support by highlighting the research of Dr. Adele Fabrikant, Effective School Leadership Researcher & former Deputy Chief, Office of Youth Engagement, District of Columbia Public Schools, Ms. Kristina Kyles-Smith, Assistant State Superintendent, Division of Student, Family, and School Support, Maryland Statement Department of Education (MSDE) in charge of Maryland's MTSS-Maryland Framework, and case studies from Cecil, Prince George's, and Worcester County Public Schools. 

Learning Outcomes:
Participants will walk away with an increased...

  • Knowledge of effective statewide and district-wide research-based effective practices to deliver multi-tiered systems of support;
  • Understanding about what it takes to implement these systems; and 
  • Awareness of the lessons learned by local districts as they develop positive and effective responses to the needs of their students.

 

Using the ELD 2.0 Framework to Improve Instructional Programs for ELLs 

This session was originally held on April 22, 2015.

In this webinar you will learn about the Framework for Raising Expectations and Instructional Rigor for English Language Learners and how the School District of Philadelphia has used this framework, dubbed ELD 2.0, to clarify the goals and re-design their instructional program for ELLs.

 Presenters: 

  • Debra Hopkins, ELL Project Coordinator, Council for Great City Schools
  • Gabriela Uro, Director ELL Policy and Research, Council for Great City Schools
  • Allison W. Still, Deputy Chief, Office of Multilingual Curriculum and Programs, School District of Philadelphia
  • Erica Darken, Curriculum Development Specialists, Office of Multilingual Curriculum and Programs, School District of Philadelphia

Learning objectives: 
By the end of the session, participants will:

  • Understand the theory of action of the Framework that calls for higher expectations for ELLs;
  • Understand the components of the Framework and its application to district planning for ELLs;
  • and Understand the criteria for selecting instructional materials for ELLs.

Slides (PDF)

Framework Handout (PDF)

Video: Classroom Example of Teaching Complex Text: Butterfly

 


Equity Strategies for K-12 STEM Classrooms: A Focus on Gender, Race, and Computer Science

This session was originally held on March 16, 2015.

melissa-kochPresenter: Melissa Koch, Senior Education Developer, SRI International and Director of Build IT, ICT4me, and InnovaTE3

 

 






Description: Why all the fuss about computer science, coding and underrepresented populations? Can we just give everyone more time learning to code? This interactive workshop allows participants to learn about and explore key concepts in creating equitable computer science curricula and classrooms. These research-based approaches enable educators to welcome and support underrepresented populations (e.g. girls, African Americans, Latinos/as) in learning computer science and considering computer science careers. Much of the workshop’s content is relevant to other STEM subjects as well.

Learning Outcomes:
As a result of your participation in this workshop, you will:

  • learn about strategies for recruiting and retaining students in computer science classrooms and encouraging students’ computer science learning; and
  • gain familiarity with key issues in computer science specifically and STEM in general, such as stereotype threat, role models, effort-focused mindset, collaboration, play, and social and personal connections.

About the Presenter: Melissa Koch is Senior Educational Developer in SRI International’s Center for Technology in Learning (CTL). Koch leads multidisciplinary teams in the development and research of engineering, computer science, and technology-based gender-equitable curricula. She is the director of three ongoing STEM programs for underrepresented youth: Build IT, ICT4me, and InnovaTE3.

Slides (PDF)

 

 

From Mistakes to Mastery: Using Misconceptions, Missed Opportunities, and Mistakes for Better Teaching and Learning in Science

This session was originally held on November 17, 2014.

Target Audience: Science teachers and STEM instructional leaders in K-12

Presenters:

  • David May, Project Director of the Minority Student Pipeline Math Science Partnership and a STEM specialist at the University System of Maryland
  • Felicia J. Martin Latief, Ed.D., STEM Instructional Supervisor for Prince George's County Public Schools (PGCPS)
  • Linda M. Armwood, Environmental Literacy Outreach Educator, PGCPS
  • Tanisha L. Johnson, Science Instructional Coach, PGCPS 

Description: Join us for a discussion of the process to help educators recognize and use all of the 'mis-es' in science class - MISconceptions, MISsed opportunities, and MIStakes - as opportunities for deeper learning.

Objectives:

By the end of the webinar, participants will...

  • Learn to identify and define misconceptions, missed opportunities, and mistakes commonly occurring in science class;
  • Increase their understanding of how these common errors can be employed as strategies to increase learning and student engagement; and
  • Gain understanding of the role teachers and students play in scientific inquiry as a process for learning and engagement.

Slides (PDF)

 

Creating School Wide System Change to Reduce Disparities In Discipline

This session was originally held on September 23, 2014.

Presenters:
Cherie R. Brown, CEO
National Coalition Building Institute

Joyce Shabazz
Consulting Associate
National Coalition Building Institute

Target Audience:
Superintendents, administrators, educators, staff in Mid-Atlantic School Districts

Description:
NCBI has partnered with a school district in California mandated to increase equity in discipline for the past five years. NCBI partnered with the district to implement a systemic, comprehensive initiative working with school board members, administrators, teachers, parents, students, and staff. Principles and skills were taught to contribute to changing school climate and reducing racial disparities in discipline. In this webinar, NCBI will describe best practices and skill sets to successfully reduce disparities.

Learning Objectives:

  1. How to build a system wide school climate to welcome diversity and inclusion
  2. How to implement a set of cultural competency skills for teachers and administrators who administer discipline
  3. How to bring programs like NCBI into School Districts to effectively reduce disparities
  4. How to engage students and parents in every step of diversity and inclusion work

SLIDES (PDF)

 

Equity, Inclusion and Opportunity: Delving into Success Gaps to Improve Achievement for All Students

This session was originally held on June 17, 2014.

Target Audience: State Department of Education School Improvement Specialists, District School Improvement Leaders, Principals, Special Education Educators, and School Leadership Teams.

Presenters:

  • Kristin Reedy, Director of the Northeast Regional Resource Center (NERRC) at WESTED
  • Tom Munk, Ph.D., Senior Education Analyst, Westat
  • Susan DuRant, Senior Analyst, Southeastern Regional Resource Center (SERRC)
  • Nancy O'Hara, Technical Service Provider, Mid-South Regional Resource Center

Description: As districts strive to meet the diverse instructional needs and/or behavior of all students it is important to examine the factors that might lead to success gaps in educational outcomes. Addressing these gaps requires a close examination of issues of equity, inclusion, and opportunity. The Regional Resource Center Program (RRCP) has developed The Success Gaps Tool, a process for reducing the differences in school success between subgroups of students, to help districts or schools examine current practices and identify areas for improvement. Participants in this webinar will develop an understanding of the components of the tool and will have the opportunity to discuss how it could be used in their school or district as a component of the improvement process.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Participants will become familiar with The Success Gaps Tool to reduce differences in school success between subgroups of students.
  • Participants will identify multiple ways to include the review of success gaps in their overall improvement process.
  • Participants will identify a team to support the improvement planning for students who experience success gaps.

Presenter Bios:

Kristin Reedy has been the Director of the Northeast Regional Resource Center (NERRC) serving NJ, RI, MA, and NY at WestEd for the past 15 years. Kristin was a member of the RRCP Disproportionality Probity Team and helped to develop the Success Gaps documents. Prior to her work at NERRC, Kristin served as a local special education director in two Vermont school districts, was a consultant with the Special Education Division at the Vermont Department of Education, and state coordinator of the early childhood special education/619 program. Kristin holds an Ed.D. in Leadership and Policy Studies from the University of Vermont.

Tom Munk, Ph.D., is a Senior Education Analyst at Westat with an emphasis on equity. He has co-authored two Technical Assistance Guides for states on the measurement of disproportionality in special education. He also has ten years of experience as a teacher of at-risk students.

Susan DuRant works with the Southeastern Regional Resource Center (SERRC) as Senior Analyst, providing Technical Assistance to states. She retired as State Director of Special Education in South Carolina, has provided consulting services in special education and was a local special education director. Susan is parent of an adult with Autism.

Nancy O'Hara is a Technical Service Provider with the Mid-South Regional Resource Center. She also convened the Disproportionality Priority Team for the Regional Resource Program. Nancy has also been a State Director of Special Education and an Associate Superintendent for Innovative Instruction with the Georgia Department of Education.


SLIDES (PDF)

HANDOUT: Indicators of Success Rubric (Word)

HANDOUT: Equity, Inclusion and Opportunity: Addressing Success Gaps (PDF)

 


Challenges and Successes in Meeting the Educational Needs of Children and Youth Experiencing Homelessness

This session was originally held on March 18, 2014.

Presenters:

  • Nicole Anderson, Pennsylvania's Region 4 (Urban Pittsburg, IU 3), Education for Children and Youth Experiencing Homelessness Program (ECYEH) Coordinator
  • Wendy Kinnear, Pennsylvania's Region 5 (Mid-western IU 4), ECYEH Coordinator
  • Dr. Patricia A. Popp, Virginia State Coordinator for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth
  • Edwin Darden, J.D., Director of Education Law and National Network Collaboration, Appleseed, Washington, D.C.
  • Diana Bowman, Director, National Center for Homeless Education (NCHE) at The SERVE Center, University of North Carolina, Greensboro, NC

Target Audience:

  • State/district coordinators or liaisons in charge of ECYEH
  • District Student Services Personnel
  • Counselors/Teachers responsible for ECYEH
  • Advocacy/Community Groups seeking to strengthen ECYEH

Description: This webinar will focus on the challenges and successes that have been experienced in Pennsylvania and Virginia to meet the educational needs of Children and Youth Experiencing Homelessness. In addition, we will learn how the Appleseed Network has helped promote advocacy in Massachusetts and nationally to improve the way states identify unaccompanied homeless youth and how we can best reach and serve the needs of this vulnerable student population. Finally, participants will learn about other national best practices and resources available through the National Center for Homeless Education.

Learning Objectives
By the end of the webinar, participants will:

  • Gain an understanding of common challenges and potential solutions to educating homeless students;
  • Increase their knowledge of some regional and statewide approaches to strengthen the ECYEH;
  • Increase their awareness of the unique challenges posed by unaccompanied homeless youth and how best to meet their educational needs; and
  • Learn about national best practices and resources available to state departments of education and local districts.

SESSION RECORDING & SLIDES

Slides (PDF)

 

 

Keeping the PEACE: Fostering a Culture of Teaching and Learning

This session was originally held on February 12, 2014.

Presented by:

  • Mr. Wendell Coleman, Principal;
  • Ms. Ashanti Foster, Academic Dean;
  • Brother Victorious Hall, Academic Dean - Oxon Hill Middle School, Prince George's County, Maryland

Audience: All School and Community Stakeholders

Session Description: The culture of your school is the fabric with which your teaching and learning is woven. Without a firm foundation, it is difficult to focus on teaching and learning. At Oxon Hill Middle School, building relationships with all stakeholders includes staff retreats, community partnerships and cultivating teacher leadership. Explore ways that you can use positive energy to activate constant elevation.

Learning Objectives
In this webinar, participants will:

  • Identify key components of a healthy school climate.
  • Analyze and compare OHMS practices to their own.
  • Commit to three actions/activities to enhance their school community.

SESSION RECORDING & SLIDES

Slides (PDF)

 

  

Addressing the Needs of the Whole Child: Inter-Agency and Community Collaborations for Student Success

This session was originally held on November 19, 2013.

Presented by:

  • Carolyn Camacho, Site Coordinator, Identity at Watkins Mill High School Wellness Center (MD)
  • Luis Cardona, Youth Violence Prevention Coordinator, Positive Youth Initiative, Montgomery County (MD)  Department of Health and Human Services
  • Christian Rhodes, Education Policy Advisor, Office of the County Executive (MD)
  • Corey Smedley, Assistant Chief S/A to DCAO for Public Safety, Prince George's County Government (MD)

Audience: Administrators, Teachers, Student Services Providers, Community Leaders

Session Description: As families and schools face challenging economic times, finding innovative ways to form inter-agency and community collaborations is key to supporting student success. This webinar highlights two innovative programs that link schools and communities together to meet the growing needs of families, children, and youth so all can thrive. The first program is the Transforming Neighborhoods Initiative (TNI). Christian Rhodes and Corey Smedley will describe how TNI focuses on providing coordinated economic, health, public safety, and educational services to six neighborhoods in Prince George's County, MD. The second program is the Wellness Centers in Montgomery County Public Schools, MD. Luis Cardona and Carolyn Camacho explain how the Wellness Centers work with children and their families in the school community to reach their full potential by offering coordinated medical care, preventive and psychosocial services, quality counseling, positive youth development, and health education, in a culturally sensitive and confidential manner.

Learning Objectives
In this webinar, participants will:

  • Gain an understanding of how inter-agency and community-based collaborations with districts/schools can increase students' achievement and well-being;
  • Learn about two innovative Maryland programs: the Transforming Neighborhoods Initiative from Prince George's County and the Wellness Center Program in Montgomery County; and
  • Develop an understanding of common barriers to this work and conditions/resources needed for success. 

SESSION RECORDING & SLIDES

Slides (PDF)

 

Creating Professional Learning Communities and Leadership Teams to Close the Racial Academic Achievement Gap

This session was originally held on September 12, 2013.

Presenters:

  • John Landesman, Coordinator, Montgomery County Public Schools Study Circles Program
  • Alex Cartagena, Parent Community Coordinator, Montgomery County Public Schools Study Circles Program

Target Audience: District/School-based Administrators, Staff Development Teachers, & Teacher Leaders

Learning Objectives:
In this webinar, participants will:

  • Gain an understanding of the Study Circles model and how it is being used to develop Professional Learning Communities that focus on addressing the racial academic achievement gap;
  • Increase knowledge of strategies to incorporate student experiences and voice into schools’ planning and improvement process; and
  • Identify common themes that arise from these dialogues and increase knowledge of how Study Circles can help teams move through this process.

Description: Since 2003, MCPS Study Circles Program has engaged over 7200 stakeholders in 406 study circles that address racial and ethnic barriers to student achievement and parent involvement. It has been uniquely successful at engaging and fostering ongoing relationships with parents, students, and staff who reflect the racial, ethnic, socioeconomic and geographic diversity of MCPS. More recently, the process has been used to help school leadership teams become Professional Learning Communities that have the trust and process for talking about, analyzing, and implementing strategies with a racial lens.

SESSION RECORDING & SLIDES

Slides (PDF)

Websites referenced in the session:

Study Circles Facilitator's Resource                            
Montgomery County Public Schools - Study Circles Program                        
Everyday Democracy

 

Utilizing Early Warning Systems (EWS) to Provide Support to Students and Schools

This session was originally held on August 22, 2013.

Presenter: Robert Murphy, Specialist, School Completion, Discipline, and Alternative Programs, Maryland State Department of Education

Description: This webinar will discuss development and effective implementation of an Early Warning Systems (EWS). Special attention will be given to highlighting risk and protective factors schools should consider prior to development of an EWS, use of cost effective tools, and how to use EWS to build and monitor systems of support for students, schools, and families.

Target audience: Administrators, Student Support Coordinators, Counselors

Learning Objectives:
Participants will...

  • Learn how to develop EWS systems;
  • Gain an understanding of how EWS can be used to monitor and be prescriptive for certain behaviors;
  • Examine their current data systems and current systems can inform decision making about the development of EWS; and
  • Learn how to use EWS to build multi-tiered systems of support.


SESSION RECORDING & SLIDES

Slides (PDF format - handouts)

 

 Developing Academic Literacy with English Learners in Grades 6-12

This session was originally held on April 17, 2013.

Presenters:
Laura Wright, Senior Research Associate, Center for Applied Linguistics
Lisa Tabaku, Director, PreK-12 ELL Education, Center for Applied Linguistics
 
Target Audience: Secondary content and ESL teachers and administrators who serve EL students

Learning Objectives:
As a result of this online session, participants can expect to:

  • Recognize and explain multimodal forms of literacy in the context of different content areas
  • Identify academic practices promoted by the national standards that are interconnected with academic language
  • Describe best practices of instruction for developing academic literacy and language in the content areas

Description: New national standards provide an opportunity to re-conceptualize what literacy and language development mean for ELs in academic contexts. This session will explain and provide examples of a 21st century approach to literacy development.


SESSION SLIDES & HANDOUTS

Slides (PDF format - handouts)



From the Ground Up: Supporting Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Families of Children with Disabilities in Virginia

This session was originally held on March 15, 2013.

Presenters:
Dana Yarbrough, Director, Center for Family Involvement, Partnership for People with Disabilities at Virginia Commonwealth University
Mauretta Copeland, Cultural Liaison to the African American Community, Center for Family Involvement
Maria Isabel Frangenberg, Cultural Liaison to the Latino Community, Center for Family Involvement

Audience: General and Special education teachers, Parents of children with disabilities, administrators, State agency staff/policymakers, PTI staff, ESL professionals  

Session Description: In this webinar, Virginia's University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities will share their experience using best practices to improve access to educational and health care systems for culturally and linguistically diverse families who have children with disabilities or special health care needs. The webinar will feature the Center for Family Involvement's cultural broker initiative.

Learning Objectives:
In this session, participants will:

  • Learn about Virginia's University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities' Center for Family Involvement
  • Hear about lessons learned while establishing a cultural outreach program
  • Learn effective strategies for building and sustaining interagency collaboration
  • Get tips on effective outreach to culturally and linguistically diverse families who have children with disabilities or special health care needs
  • Learn about resources for equal language access and for improving communication with families
  • Understand the difference between translation and interpretation
  • Understand the impact of the growing number of linguistically diverse communities.


SESSION RECORDING, SLIDES & HANDOUTS

View the recorded online presentation

Slides (PDF format - handouts)

 


Reaching and Teaching Students in Poverty: An Equity Literacy Approach

This session was originally held on February 22, 2013.

Presenter: Paul C. Gorski, Founder EdChange and Associate Professor, Integrative Studies at George Mason University

Target Audience: Administrators, Title I Coordinators, and Teachers 

Description: Many of the most popular strategies for bolstering academic achievement among students in poverty run counter to two decades of research. The most common mistake, perhaps, has been focusing so intently on questions of culture rather than questions of equity. Dr. Gorski will discuss this shift in focus and share his synthesis and analysis of 20 years of research. From this work, Dr. Gorski’s, has identified a comprehensive list of effective, research-based, and on-the-ground strategies to reach and teach students in poverty.

Learning objectives:
By the end of this session participants will:

  • Learn about the major themes from the last 20 years of research on teaching students in poverty;
  • Explore the most common ineffective strategies for reaching and teaching low-income students, based on that research and why they are ineffective; and
  • Become familiar, through an introduction to the Equity Literacy model, with on-the-ground, research-based strategies for reaching and teaching students in poverty.

 

SESSION RECORDING, SLIDES & HANDOUTS

View the recorded online presentation

Slides
(PDF format - handouts)

 


Erasing the Opportunity Gap: How Your District Can Assess Resource Equity and Propel Achievement

This session was originally held on January 31, 2013.

Presenter: Edwin C. Darden, J.D., Director of Education Law and Policy, Appleseed

Description: This session is designed to help school board members, educators, and parents to think differently about how education resources are deployed in high-poverty neighborhoods versus schools in affluent neighborhoods within the same district. Aside from money, key resources that translate to greater learning opportunities include: principal/teacher preparation and experience; building conditions; access to advanced classes; and more. With the preoccupation on outcomes, this session suggests that renewed attention on inputs and leveraging the authority that local school boards have to distribute resources can unlock a powerful tool for improving achievement in struggling schools. This strategy coupled with training from the Equity Center, can help facilitate essential conversations between school board members and district staff, empower district administrators to think critically as agents of equity within their school systems, and offer support for embarking on a process that opens access to educational opportunities for all children.

Target Audience: Superintendents, Central Office Administrators, School Board Members, Principals, Teachers, and Parents

Learning Objectives:
By the end of this session participants will:

  • Increase their understanding of “resource equity” and their role as decision-makers in resource allocation;
  • Gain strategies and tools to measure resource distribution in their own districts; and
  • Learn about available Equity Center trainings to help district leaders integrate equity considerations into their roles.


SESSION RECORDING, SLIDES & HANDOUTS

View the recorded online presentation

Slides (PDF format - handouts)

 


Common Core Standards: Designing an Engaging Curriculum for Diverse Learners

This session was originally held on December 3, 2012.

Presenters: Jay McTighe, Education Author and Consultant and Margo Gottlieb, Ph.D., Lead Developer, WIDA

Session Description: As states adopt the Common Core Standards and WIDA, educators need a means for developing an engaging curriculum that engages all learners. Unpacking Common Core Standards means learning specific strategies into goals, understandings, and essential questions. For English Language Learners this means paying close attention to the role of academic language in the new standards and classroom strategies for highlighting language in instructional practices.

Target Audience: Administrators, teachers, ELL specialists and ESOL teachers

Learning objectives:
After viewing this webinar recording, participants will have:

  • Examine a practical framework for transforming CCSS into curriculum that emphasizes understanding and long-term transfer
  • Learn specific strategies for “unpacking” the CCSS into transfer goals, understandings, and essential questions
  • Examine the role of academic language and content in standards
  • Explore the integration of language and content in standards
  • Experience how to highlight language in instructional practices
  • Be introduced to a collection of excellent, supportive websites


SESSION RECORDING, SLIDES & HANDOUTS

View the recorded online presentation

Slides - Developing an Understanding-based Curriculum around Common Core Standards  (PDF format - handouts)

Slides - Common Core Standards for Diverse Learners: Classroom Ideas for Integrating Content and Language (PDF format - handouts)

Handout - From Common Core Standards to Curriculum: Five Big Ideas (PDF format)

Handout - Margo Gottlieb Resources (PDF format)

     

    The Dream Act: Legislation and Policies to Keep Undocumented Youth in Schools

    This session was originally held on November 16, 2012.

    Presenter Name: Laura Vazquez, Immigration Legislative Analyst Immigration Policy Project, National Council of La Raza

    Session Description: This online session will give an overview of the Dream Act legislation and the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals policy and its impact for schools. As educators it is important to know about the challenges that undocumented youth face legally and educationally due to their immigration status. Though public education is available to all youth, regardless of immigration status, many students face fears, anxiety and disengagement in learning when they realize that the options for higher education are limited. Learn about common challenges undocumented youth face and resources available to support families and educators trying to keep students in schools.

    Target audience: SEA Specialists, School administrators, teachers, and counselors

    Learning objectives:
    After viewing this webinar recording, participants will have:

    • Received an overview of the DREAM Act
    • A greater understanding of recent policies such as the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals and its implications for schooling
    • Increase their knowledge of common challenges faced by undocumented youth and resources available to help them realize their higher education aspirations


    SESSION RECORDING, SLIDES & HANDOUTS


    View the recorded online presentation

    Slides - The Dream Act: Legislation and Policies to Keep Undocumented Youth in Schools (PDF format - handouts)

       



    Understanding the Needs of Sexual Minority and Gender Non-Conforming Youth


    This session was originally held on Friday October 26, 2012.


    Presenters
    :
    Lynne Muller, Race to the Top Student Services Specialist, Maryland State Department of Education
    Nora Cartland, Senior Educational Equity Specialist, Mid-Atlantic Equity Center

    Target Audience: School administrators, teachers, state department personnel, counselors

    Session Description: LGBT youth are more than twice as likely as their straight peers to attempt suicide (Eisenberg and Resnick, 2006). Given this startling health statistic, educators must find ways of creating a safe environment for all students. This session will address who are our sexual minority and gender non-comforming youth, what their needs are, how these needs fit into our role as educators, provide examples of respectful and effective Board of Education policy, offer strategies and examples of programs currently used in schools to increase respect for all students, and provide resources for educators to consider as they seek to foster a climate of acceptance and tolerance in schools.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Participants will be able to identify the needs of sexual minority and gender non-conforming youth in our schools.
    2. Participants will be able to understand the effects of bullying and harassment on sexual minority and gender non-conforming youth.
    3. Participants will be able to identify components of effective programs that foster a climate of acceptance and tolerance in the schools.


    SESSION RECORDING, SLIDES & HANDOUTS

    View the recorded online presentation

    Slides - Addressing the Needs of Sexual Minority Youth (PDF format - handouts)

    U.S. Department of Education - Office of Civil Rights - Sexual Harrassment Letter (PDF format)

    Equal Access Act (PDF format)

    Sexual Orientation Resources (PDF format)

    Student Problem Identification and Resolution of Issues Together (SPIRIT) brochure (PDF format)

      


    Assessing and Enhancing School Climate and Culture  

    This session was originally held on Tuesday, September 25, 2012.

    Target Audience: K-12 administrators, teachers, guidance counselors, school nurses, student assistance team members, central office professionals, and superintendents

    Presenter: Michelle Nutter, Safe and Supportive Schools Manager, Pennsylvania Center for Safe Schools

    Session Description: As schools face increasing pressure to ensure the academic success of all students, these efforts must be guided by a greater emphasis on student connectedness.  In order to perform academically, students must feel safe, respected and connected to the adults and other students in their school.  By focusing on creating a positive, welcoming school climate, schools stress the importance of belonging.  By enhancing students’ connectedness to schools, students are more likely to stay in school and be engaged in their education.  This session will provide participants with an overview of research concerning school climate and connectedness, tools to assess current school climate and resources to create and maintain a positive school climate.

    Learning outcomes:

    1. Participants will recognize the important connection between school climate and academic achievement.
    2. Participants will understand the difference between school climate and school culture.
    3. Participants will identify ways to increase student connectedness.


    SESSION RECORDING, SLIDES AND HANDOUTS

    View the recorded online presentation

    Presentation slides (PDF format)

    Handout: School Climate Research Summary (PDF format)

    NOTE: In order to view the recorded presentation, you must have the Blackboard Collaborate Java application downloaded to your personal computer. There is no cost to download the software. To configure your computer, visit the Blackboard Collaborate support page

     

     

    Promoting Equity and Excellence for All:  Welcoming and Teaching Newcomer Children in U.S. Schools

     This session was originally held on Wednesday, August 29, 2012.     

    Presenters:
    •    Lyn Morland, Director, Bridging Refugee Youth & Children's Services
    •    Susan Schmidt, Consultant, Bridging Refugee Youth & Children's Services

    Target Audience: K-12 administrators, teachers, central office professionals, superintendents    

    Session Description: This session addressed the diversity, strengths and needs of the growing number of immigrant students in our classrooms today, with a focus on creating a welcoming and positive school climate and strategies for teaching content to English Language Learners. A school system that recently transformed as a result of an influx of Karen (Burmese) refugees will describe their experiences and "lessons learned".

    Learning Outcomes:
    At the end of this online session, participants will be able to:

    • Identify the equity issues that relate to the challenges that children of immigrants face in the classroom, with a focus on creating a welcoming and positive school climate and effective strategies for teaching content to English Language Learners
    • Understand how to apply the "lessons learned" from the experiences of a Minnesota school system as well as other promising practices; and
    • Recognize what it takes for immigrant and refugee students to succeed in American schools.


    SESSION RECORDING, SLIDES AND HANDOUTS

    View the recorded online presentation

    Presentation slides (PDF format)

    NOTE: In order to view the recorded presentation, you must have the Blackboard Collaborate Java application downloaded to your personal computer. There is no cost to download the software. To configure your computer, visit the Blackboard Collaborate support page

     



    Establishing Effective STEM Professional Learning Communities (PLCs)

    This session was originally held on June 4, 2012.

    Presenter: Dr. Ted Britton, Associate Director, STEM Program, WestED

    Target Audience: PLC facilitators, directors of professional development, building administrators, STEM teachers, STEM coordinators

    Session Description: Professional Learning Communities (PLCs) are rapidly spreading as a major professional development strategy, including within the STEM arena. Evidence is growing that shows STEM teachers who participate in well-designed and implemented PLCs promote better student learning outcomes in science and mathematics.

    This webinar focused on a synthesis of the research funded by the National Science Foundation. Dr. Britton highlighted the positive results that can be generated from teacher participation in STEM PLCs; especially when key issues are addressed in their design and implementation.

    Learning Outcomes:
    At the end of this online session, participants will be able to:

    • Increase their research knowledge of effective STEM PLCs;
    • Understand the conditions necessary to optimize PLC outcomes;
    • Learn the six critical design and implementation issues to consider for STEM PLC implementation. 

     

    SESSION RECORDING, SLIDES AND HANDOUTS

    View the recorded online presentation

    Presentation slides (PDF format)

    HANDOUT: STEM Teachers in Professional Learning Communities: From Good Teachers to Great Teaching


    HANDOUT: STEM Teachers in Professional Learning Communities: A Knowledge Synthesis

    NOTE: In order to view the recorded presentation, you must have the Blackboard Collaborate Java application downloaded to your personal computer. There is no cost to download the software. To configure your computer, visit the Blackboard Collaborate support page

     


    Dissonant Harmony: A Conversation about What We Must Do to Enhance the Achievement of African American Males

    This session was originally held on May 24, 2012.

    Presenters:

    • Joshua Parker, English/Language Arts Department Chair, Windsor Mill Middle School, Baltimore County Public Schools, Maryland Teacher of the Year
    • Lisa Williams, Director, Office of Equity and Cultural Proficiency,  Baltimore County Public Schools

    Target Audience: K-12 administrators, teachers, central office professionals, superintendents

    Session Description: Secretary Duncan has stated that “the high drop-out rate is the Civil Rights issue of this decade.” Research indicates that, nationwide, less than 50% of African American males graduate from high school and even fewer make it to and complete college. The implications resonate in all sectors of our economy. As educators, we need to confront this failing. The session will explore specific engagement challenges related to African American males via the historic, social, and academic context. The presenters will offer suggestions for implementing positive approaches to engage African American males in the  classroom.

    Learning Outcomes:
    At the end of this online session, participants will be able to:

    • Recognize specific social, economic and academic engagement challenges related to African American males
    • Learn interpersonal skills and verbal scripts that will enable African American males to invest, and achieve in, education
    • Implement strategies to improve the academic performance of African American males

    SESSION RECORDING AND SLIDES

    View the recorded online presentation

    Presentation slides (PDF format)

    NOTE: In order to view the recorded presentation, you must have the Blackboard Collaborate Java application downloaded to your personal computer. There is no cost to download the software. To configure your computer, visit the Blackboard Collaborate support page

     

     

    Part II: Civil Rights in the Classroom: Special Education, Discipline and Homelessness

    This session was originally held on April 26, 2012.

    Presenter: Natasha Quiroga, Associate Counsel, Educational Opportunities Project, Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under Law

    Audience: District level Civil Rights assurance officers, Student Services Coordinators, Pupil Personnel Workers, Special Education Coordinators, social workers and classroom teachers

    Description: Do you know how civil rights laws affect classrooms? What important information must district and school staff keep in mind when planning and implementing programs? Natasha Quiroga will present important points to consider in the areas of Special Education, Discipline and Homelessness.

    Learning Outcomes:
    At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to:

    • Increase their knowledge of relevant civil rights laws and issues as they pertain to the classroom
    • Deepen their understanding regarding the impact race, ethnicity, gender, special education, and discipline have on student achievement and school reform
    • Recognize the role that teachers play in ensuring equitable access and opportunity for all students

    SESSION RECORDING AND SLIDES

    View the recorded online presentation

    Presentation slides (PDF format)

    NOTE: In order to view the recorded presentation, you must have the Blackboard Collaborate Java application downloaded to your personal computer. There is no cost to download the software. To configure your computer, visit the Blackboard Collaborate support page

     


    Cultural Validity in Assessment
     

    This session was originally held on March 16, 2012.

    Are assessments fair and valid for all students? How can we determine if assessment results are a true reflection of a student's knowledge? Presenters Basterra, Flores, and Trumbull will discuss findings and illustrate the concept of "culturally valid assessment" from their book, Cultural Validity in Assessment: Addressing Linguistic and Cultural Diversity. This approach takes into consideration students' socio-cultural backgrounds, educational experience, home language, communication style, and how they learn. The webinar will share lessons learned from research and field experiences, illustrated by apt and eye-opening examples of how the failure to consider students' contexts in designing assessments and assessment practices can result in wrong conclusions about student learning. Participants will also receive strategies to promote cultural validity in assessment.

    Learning Outcomes:
    At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to:

    • Understand the concept of cultural validity and its relevance to today's assessment
    • Recognize how cognition, language, and culture have an impact on assessment performance
    • Identify potential assessment sources of misinformation about student learning
    • Learn how to use and implement culturally valid assessments in the classroom.

    Presented by:

    • Guillermo Solano Flores, Assoc. Professor, Bilingual Education and ESL, Univ. of Colorado Boulder
    • Elise Trumbull, Independent Consultant, Oakland, California
    • Maria del Rosario Basterra, Deputy Director, The Mid-Atlantic Equity Center

    SESSION RECORDING AND SLIDES

    View the recorded online presentation

    Presentation slides (PDF format)

    NOTE: In order to view the recorded presentation, you must have the Blackboard Collaborate Java application downloaded to your personal computer. There is no cost to download the software. To configure your computer, visit the Blackboard Collaborate support page

     


    Civil Rights in the Classroom

    This session was originally held on February 13, 2012.

    Presenter: Natasha Quiroga, Associate Counsel, Educational Opportunities Project, Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under Law

    Session Description: The civil rights of public school students must be safeguarded to ensure equal access and opportunity for all students.  What are these civil rights laws? Who is responsible for complying with these laws? Where do teachers fit in?  This webinar for school administrators and teachers will provide an overview of civil rights laws and issues as they pertain to the classroom, discuss their impact on student achievement and school reform, and provide participants with practical tips to apply in the classroom.

     Learning Outcomes:
    At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to:

    • Learn about the relevant civil rights laws and issues as they pertain to the classroom
    • Understand the impact race, ethnicity, gender, special education and discipline have on student achievement and school reform
    • Recognize the role that teachers play in ensuring equitable access and opportunity for all students

    About the Presenter - Natasha Quiroga

    Natasha Quiroga is an Associate Counsel for the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law’s Educational Opportunities Project, where she manages the Parental Readiness and Empowerment Program. Previously, Natasha served as the first executive director for Educación Para Nuestro Futuro (formerly Escuela Bolivia) in Arlington, Virginia, an organization which seeks to empower Latino children, youth and families through education and leadership. Natasha later joined a boutique education firm where she advised state and local education agencies.

    She is a board member of Edu-Futuro and the Latino/a Alumni Association of the Washington College of Law. She also volunteers on the scholarship and mentor committees of the Esperanza Education Fund, has been a long-time reader for the University of Texas Scholarship Committee, and represents a minor requesting asylum through her pro bono work with Kids In Need of Defense. Natasha received her J.D. and Master's in International Politics from American University and her B.B.A. in Marketing and B.A. in Plan II Liberal Arts from the University of Texas at Austin.

    SESSION RECORDING AND SLIDES

    View the recorded online presentation

    Presentation slides (PDF format)

    NOTE: In order to view the recorded presentation, you must have the Blackboard Collaborate Java application downloaded to your personal computer. There is no cost to download the software. To configure your computer, visit the Blackboard Collaborate support page

     


    Increasing the Interest of Low Performing Students in Science and Mathematics

    This session was originally held on January 17, 2012.

    Presenter: Kathy DiRanna, K-12 Alliance Director, WestEd 

    Audience: STEM Coordinators, Science and Math Specialists, Science and Math Teachers

    Session Description: Evidence is increasing that inquiry instruction and problem-based and place-based instruction are ways to increase student interest in learning science and math. This webinar will provide an overview of the research behind these approaches, a description of the key features of each one, and suggestions for implementing these approaches in classrooms.

    Learning Outcomes:
    At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to:

    • Link characteristics of powerful learning experiences to the classroom
    • Understand Key Findings from How People Learn and how to apply them to quality science and math teaching and learning
    • Learn the characteristics of inquiry-based instruction and project based learning
    • Recognize the connections among Common Core, NGSS, 21st Century Skills, inquiry, and project based learning
    • Be motivated to move from the pedagogy of poverty to the pedagogy of hope

    SESSION RECORDING, SLIDES AND HANDOUT

    View the recorded online presentation

    Presentation slides (PDF format)

    Project-Based Learning - Middle School Project: Balloon Car (YouTube video)

    Handout: Essential Features of Classroom Inquiry (PDF format)

    Handout: Scaffolding and Achievement in Problem-Based and Inquiry Learning: A Response to Kirschner, Sweller, and Clark (2006) (PDF format)

    Handout: The Pedagogy of Poverty Versus Good Teaching (PDF format)

    Handout: Website Resources (Word .doc format)

    NOTE: In order to view the recorded presentation, you must have the Blackboard Collaborate Java application downloaded to your personal computer. There is no cost to download the software. To configure your computer, visit the Blackboard Collaborate support page

     


    Boosting Success for 21st Century Learners: The Mid-Atlantic Equity Assistance Center 101
     

    This session was originally held on December 12, 2011.

    Objectives: Participants will learn more about the Mid-Atlantic Equity Assistance Center (MAC) program and free services to school boards and school districts.

    Summary: This session has a special focus on  how MAC addresses current, regional equity education issues as they reflect the unique needs of 21st century learners of diverse racial, gender and national origin groups and sub-groups. In addition, a regional and national quiz is used as a means for provoking thoughtful conversations between educators about factors that impact learning. How do district, school and student factors contribute to equitable or inequitable practices? What can MAC do to help address these issues? What are the MAC goals, technical assistance areas, long term technical assistance concentrations, upcoming regional conference and staff contact information.

    SESSION RECORDING, SLIDES AND HANDOUT

    View the recorded online presentation

    Presentation slides (PDF format)

    NOTE: In order to view the recorded presentation, you must have the Blackboard Collaborate Java application downloaded to your personal computer. There is no cost to download the software. To configure your computer, visit the Blackboard Collaborate support page

    Presenter: Melissa Koch

    Titles: Senior Education Developer, SRI International

    Director of Build IT and InnovaTE3

     

    Workshop Title: Equity Strategies for K-12 STEM classrooms: A focus on gender, race, and computer science

     

    Workshop Description: Why all the fuss about computer science, coding and underrepresented populations? Can we just give everyone more time learning to code? This interactive workshop allows participants to learn about and explore key concepts in creating equitable computer science curricula and classrooms. These research-based approaches enable educators to welcome and support underrepresented populations (e.g. girls, African Americans, Latinos/as) in learning computer science and considering computer science careers. Much of the workshop’s content is relevant to other STEM subjects as well.

     

    Learning Outcomes:

    As a result of your participation in this workshop, you will:

    •             learn about strategies for recruiting and retaining students in computer science classrooms and encouraging students’ computer science learning; and

    •             gain familiarity with key issues in computer science specifically and STEM in general, such as stereotype threat, role models, effort-focused mindset, collaboration, play, and social and personal connections.

     

    Bio: Melissa Koch is Senior Educational Developer in SRI International’s Center for Technology in Learning (CTL). Koch leads multidisciplinary teams in the development and research of engineering, computer science, and technology-based gender-equitable curricula. She is the director of three ongoing STEM programs for underrepresented youth: Build IT, ICT4me, and InnovaTE3.